Is Your Marketing Message Getting Muddled?

By Debra Kaye

When it comes to formulating your marketing message, it is imperative to be clear, concise and thoughtful to make the largest impact. If you sway the other way by providing too much information in a complicated manner, your message may get lost.

For instance, in “When Three Charms but Four Alarms: Identifying the Optimal Number of Claims in Persuasion Settings,” authors Kurt A. Carlson and Suzanne B. Shu suggest marketing messages with more than three claims trigger consumer skepticism and disbelief.

This statement can also be bolstered by the fact that having too many claims (or options) can confuse people, resulting in consumers just giving up and walking away.

Daniel McFadden, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley, told The Economist that consumers find myriad options disturbing because of the “risk of misperception and miscalculation, of misunderstanding the available alternatives, of misreading one’s own tastes, of yielding to a moment’s whim and regretting it afterwards.” This combined with “the stress of information acquisition” can result in what is known as shopper’s paralysis, a situation where consumers find the decision too difficult to decide and therefore buy nothing.

To make sure your message doesn’t get lost in the shuffle, keep these tips in mind:

Pick three attributes. What are the most important strengths or stand out qualities of your product? Make a list, whittle it down to the three essential or most compelling ones and have these be the consistent centerpiece of your messaging.

Read more: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/231015

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About Charles Stermer

Charles is the Founder, President and CEO of Stermer Consulting, Inc, a recognized expert in Operational IT Business Administration and Management across all computer services and enterprise technologies to small and medium size businesses.
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